× Close
Video by optikal bloc
Menu
Back / 2017 Season

The Village – SOLD OUT

15 May - 26 May

A La Boite and MDA Ltd production

Ordinary people in extraordinary situations

A collaboration with refugee resettlement agency MDA Ltd, The Village immerses the audience in the real stories of refugees and people seeking asylum who have made Australia their home.

All remaining performances are sold out.

 

More...

The Village showcases the cultural diversity of Australia and honours the courage, strength and determination of the women, men and children who have made this country their new home.

The Village uses the verbatim stories of refugees and people seeking asylum to guide audiences on an experiential journey.

Witness how ordinary people have found themselves in extraordinary situations and persevered to tell their life-changing stories. Audiences will engage with these stories first hand through an interactive performance experience.

The Village has been created specifically with secondary students in mind, but everyone is welcome at The Village to enjoy this collaborative theatre project.

“It felt really real, authentic. Being immersed into it, you can appreciate the stories more and actually feel part of that journey.”

Teacher

Venue

La Boite Studio & Parade Ground

Reminder – Unfortunately our bar and foyer are currently under construction. We apologise for any inconvenience.

Please be aware, there is a higher level of activity/exertion involved for this production. Please notify us upon booking tickets and when you arrive at the show if you have any access requirements.

Cast & creatives

  • Director Todd MacDonald
  • Set Design Moe Assaad
  • Sound Design Wil Hughes

Need a place to stay in Brisbane?

Why not stay with our trusted accommodation partner, Oakwood.

Book your exclusive accommodation offer with Oakwood for 2017 by calling 07 3218 5800 and quoting La Boite or book online using your exclusive promo code of PROLAB12, to receive your discounted rates from $109 per night.

→ Click here to book accommodation.

Feed

Meet Arwin Arwin – Storyteller in The Village

“I hope every Australian will allow the people who are in need of help and seeking safety to make Australia home” Arwin Arwin

A bit about Arwin Arwin

The son of the sea
More landless than the wind
An emigrant

Arwin enjoys creative writing, filmmaking and storytelling. He is currently finishing a degree in Creative Writing and Screen Studies.

At seventeen-years-old, Arwin made a journey from Afghanistan to Australia where days shackled by chains of persecution and fear were laid on his shoulders. Arwin fled his home country of Afghanistan; running with a swiftness not just of despair but also hope for a new life.

After arriving in Australia, he began year 10 at Yeronga State High school where he improved his English and found himself exploring his creative side. With the support of Mercy Family, The Edge and Queensland University of Technology, Arwin navigated the intricacies of filmmaking; My Dawning was born.

Photographs lyrical in their beauty and impact, interwoven with poetry inspired by his journey; Arwin entered My Dawning in the Queensland Multicultural Film Festival. He was nominated for ‘Best Up and Coming’, the ‘People’s Choice award’ and ‘Best Short Film’. My Dawning won all three. That was one of his best moments, a start to his career.

Following on from this success, Arwin made a second film Seeking Freedom; also about his personal experience and longing for his motherland. Now, his third short film Hello, completed by Faraway Production, Griffith Film School, and with the co-operation of Jill Bilcock, the Australian Film editor and a member of ASE. Hello will be launched soon together with his first ever poetry book. Arwin writes his poems in Farsi-Dari and translates them into English.

Arwin has explored and developed his creative skills through filmmaking, poetry, acting and photography. He has performed at the Queensland Theatre company, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland Museum, social organisations and a few educational places. He has learnt from his experiences to believe in himself and push himself to the limits.

Arwin wishes that every Australian will allow him to call Australia home and appreciate what we have in this beautiful country because what we have here, thousands and millions of others dream of.

 

Five minutes with Arwin Arwin

Thank you for sharing your deeply personal stories with us as part of The Village. What has it been like to share your own story?
It’s a pleasure to be part of such an especial project, a great platform to have a voice and an opportunity for me to connect and communicate with a wider audience. I believe the world can be a better place if we communicate, interact and understand each other. Standing up on this emotional stage is not an easy task, but I enjoy the process of cooperating with creative minds and professionals here at La Boite.  Everyone in this project is inspiring, friendly and I feel like we are all in the same boat, so I am glad that I am a part of this fantastic project.

What has the creative process been like for you so far?
The day I entered to rehearsal room to see whether I can take a part in this project, I found a lot of myself; and I said to the director of The Village; yes, I am happy to get involved in this project. It has tackled my memories and taken me back to the unforgettable journey that I made in 2012, from Afghanistan to Australia. Previously, I have explored my journey through filmmaking and poetry, but this time through storytelling to see if I can contribute to this multicultural community by simply sharing my story.

What is the most fundamental message you hope is taken away from the work?
I believe this program is helping the general public to understand the significance of multiculturalism in Australia. Particularly, our young generation who haven’t traveled much around the world. For example, letting people step into refugees’ shoes. I want every Australian to be proud of themselves for saving people’s lives; people who are genuinely seeking safety and allowing them to make Australia home. I want our audiences to start interacting with the actual people rather than listening to the media, to understand each other’s situations.

22.05.17

Five minutes with Ayeesha Ash – Assistant Director of The Village

“There's such a deep level of respect and trust between the storytellers and the creative team. It's such a privilege to be able to hear these stories first hand and to be in constant conversation about their lives and their journeys” Ayeesha Ash

Ayeesha Ash has been working hard as Assistant Director on The Village, as part of our Assistant Creatives Program. We caught up with Ayeesha on her experience so far.

What has the rehearsal process been like for you so far?
The rehearsal process has been extremely collaborative. It’s wonderful to be able to work with so many people with different ethnic backgrounds, and see how their culture is expressed through their work.

How has the process differed because the ensemble are sharing their own life stories?
There’s such a deep level of respect and trust between the storytellers and the creative team. It’s such a privilege to be able to hear these stories first hand and to be in constant conversation about their lives and their journeys.

What is the most fundamental message you hope is taken away from the work?
The strength of the human spirit.

17.05.17

Welcome back Wil Hughes – Sound Designer for The Village

“The chance to be able to meet and work with extraordinary people who’ve been through these experiences is in itself an incredibly rewarding, uplifting and humbling opportunity to explore my own values, beliefs, and understanding of the world around me” Wil Hughes

Wil’s credits as a composer, songwriter and sound designer for theatre have ranged from contemporary ballet to musicals, and include Single Asian Female, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Wind in the Willows (La Boite Theatre Company); Propel (Expressions Dance Company); The Theory of Everything (Brisbane Festival/Metro Arts); Dust Covered Butterfly (Metro Arts); Tiptoe (Pentimento Productions); Sweet Meniscus (Anywhere Theatre Festival); Legends (Storyshare International Ltd.); Unnatural Selection, Allan (Gold Coast Arts Centre/Awkward Productions); Blak Electric (Aboriginal Centre of Performing Arts) and Caligula (The Danger Ensemble/Judith Wright Centre).

His compositional work for film includes Viral (dir. Sam Van Grinsven), an official selection for the Cinequest Film Festival in California and the Down Under Film Festival in Berlin, as well as the upcoming feature, Hold On.

As a freelance theatre professional he has worked extensively with companies including La Boite Theatre Company, Queensland Ballet, Queensland Theatre Company and the Queensland Performing Arts Centre. Companies who have utilised Wil’s facilities as an audio engineer, music editor and QLab programmer include Global Creatures, Queensland Ballet, Expressions Dance Company, Bay Street Productions, La Boite Theatre Company and more.

In 2016 he was honoured with a nomination at the Australian Songwriting Awards for his work with choral writer, Donna Dyson.

How does the story of The Village resonate with you?
I’ve found that the process of creating the show has resonated with me as much as the stories that are featured in it; the chance to be able to meet and work with extraordinary people who’ve been through these experiences is in itself an incredibly rewarding, uplifting and humbling opportunity to explore my own values, beliefs, and understanding of the world around me.

Why did you want to be involved in this production?
It’s been easy to become depressed by what appears to be an endless stream of negativity and fear in the current political climate. We so rarely get to hear the voices of the people in the centre of the shouting match. When Todd first approached me about wanting to do something that would give refugees a chance to tell their own stories, and give people an honest glimpse into the minutiae and humanity of those experiences, I jumped at the chance.

What is your intention with the music for this show?
It’s important to me that all of my work only serves to support the storytelling, and to do so honestly. I’d like to free myself from any proclivity to want to dramatise this show, and I’d like it to be a natural extension of the real stories.

How will the platform of this performance and the fact it’s not in a traditional theatre setting influence the way the music and the theatre complement each other?
The practical aspects of this show are everything when it comes to the music and sound design. Essentially there’s six stories being told simultaneously in entirely separate locations around La Boite Theatre and the surrounding area, so coming up with a practical way of supporting that technically, as well as creatively and emotionally is a huge challenge. Hopefully people will walk away feeling like they’ve really experienced something, and their connections to the stories and the beautiful people telling them will have been strengthened.

15.05.17

Meet Ngoc Phan – Storyteller in The Village

“Hearing everyone else’s experience has been eye opening, confronting, joyous and challenging but ultimately inspiring” Ngoc Phan

Ngoc is a performer and playwright based in Brisbane.  Her theatre credits include A Streetcar named Desire (La Boite Theatre Company); Splendour (Now Look Here) The Motion of Light in Water and After all this (Elbow Room); Hedonism’s Second Album (La Boite indie); Speaking in Tongues (Antix productions) and Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes (Canute productions).

Her screen credits include Australia Day (Hoodlum/Foxtel); QLD Government Road Safety Speeding Commercial (Two little Indians); Pawno (Toothless pictures); Schapelle (Fremantle Media); At World’s End (New Holland Pictures); Sea Patrol (Nine Network); Terra Nova and Secrets and Lies (Network Ten) and the AFI award winning film The Black Balloon.

She was an Artist-in Residence at La Boite Theatre Company (2016) and was an Associate Artist at Queensland Theatre Company (2014). Currently Ngoc is one of the participants in the Lotus First Draft Program supported by Playwriting Australia and Contemporary Asian Australian Performance (CAAP).

Ngoc Phan graduated from the WAAPA Acting program in 2004 and studied at the Atlantic Acting School in New York 2007 doing the Practical Aesthetics Summer Intensive.

Ngoc is currently a tutor for the NIDA Open Program and has also taught in the Directing and Acting Department at Griffith Film School.

What has it been like to share your own story?
Being able to share my family’s story has been an honour and privilege, as it is a huge part of my history and identity.  Giving voice to the issues surrounding refugees and asylum seekers, through means of storytelling, is so important as it contributes to the bigger conversation we all need to have about our humanitarian responsibilities in this country.

What has the creative process been like for you so far?
Working along side all of these glorious storytellers and creatives has been a gift.  I have never had firsthand account of war, nor do I know what it is like to flee my country, therefore delving into the details of my family’s story and hearing everyone else’s experience has been eye opening, confronting, joyous and challenging but ultimately inspiring.

What is the most fundamental message you hope is taken away from the work?
We are all connected by our basic human needs and our desire for a good life. When those things are taken away, it is extraordinary what a human being will do in order to survive.  And we are all humans.

11.05.17

Meet Peter Sutherland – Stage Manager for The Village

“We live in an extraordinary world and with this work we will transport the audience to many different countries and share some amazing lives with them” Peter Sutherland

Pete Sutherland has had a career in Stage Management that spans over two decades. He has stage managed for most of the significant theatre companies in Australia and he has also worked internationally.

Single Asian Female wasPete’s first show with La Boite Theatre Company and we’re excited to have him back for The Village!

The directors Pete has stage managed for include Todd MacDonald, Kate Cherry, John Bell, Wesley Enoch, Robyn Nevin, Neil Armfield, Michael Gow, Stephen Page, Andrea Moor, Jason Klarwein, Judy Davis, Simon Phillips, Richard Wherrett, Peter Evans, Debbie Allan and Garry McDonald.

Some highlights of Pete’s career include stage managing John Bell’s final show as Artistic Director of the Bell Shakespeare Company The Tempest 2015 and the tenth anniversary revival of David Page’s award winning one-man-show Page 8 for Bangarra Dance Theatre.

What has the rehearsal process been like for you so far?
I have thoroughly enjoyed this rehearsal process. There has been no script, and the performers (storytellers) are real people telling their own stories. Developing this show has been something totally different to the type of theatre I normally work on. As the stories unfold various technical problems and unusual props arise from the process that make my life very interesting.

How has the process differed because the ensemble are sharing their own life stories?
We are not doing something that has been scripted. The performers start by telling their own stories and then we look for common themes and links between the stories. Trying to finesse what each of the story tellers so it is a perfect 10 minute story that also works with the other collections of stories from the other story stellers is both challenging and fun. These performers are all inspiring people who have experienced things beyond what I can imagine.

What is the most fundamental message you hope is taken away from the work?
The importance of life, freedom, art, beauty and mankind. We live in an extraordinary world and with this work we will transport the audience to many different countries and share some amazing lives with them.

 

10.05.17

Set Designer Moe Assaad returns for The Village

“My intention is to be able to portray the day-to-day challenges, experiences and personal stories of refugees and asylum seekers during their journeys to Australia” Moe Assaad

Moe Assaad is a passionate Scenographer and Interior Architect. He was born in Beirut during the civil war period, which had a lasting impact on his career trajectory. Spending hours on end in underground shelters, the sounds of bombing and shelling has ignited his imagination and creativity to an imagined reality that is different from the one outside the shelter.

During his teenage years, he strengthened this creativity by volunteering his Scenography ideas and design sketches to various social and cultural institutions during special events while constructing the set himself during exhibitions.  Although scenography was not available as a separate field of study during his undergraduate school years, a strong foundation in Architecture is needed for every Scenographer.

Moe Assaad graduated with a Bachelors and Masters degree in Interior Architecture from the Lebanese University before pursuing his second Masters in Scenography when the program first opened in 2009. He was one of ten graduates representing the first cohort of Scenographers in Lebanon. He then moved to the United States where he designed sets for classic and contemporary plays for proscenium, thrust and theatre-in-the-round stages. Some of the productions he worked on for the 2nd Story Theatre and Brown University Theatre Department include, Twelfth Night, Amadeous, Le Dindon or the Dupe, and Sons of the Prophet among others.

In August 2015 Moe moved to Australia and started working for La Boite Theatre Company shortly thereafter. He is the Scenographer for The Village and Single Asian Female 2017 productions.  Beyond the theatre, Moe Assaad is interested in TV, Opera and Film productions.

How does the story of The Village resonate with you? 
The Village is a project that has deep resonance to me because of my background having experienced first hand the experiences of displacement and war. I grew up during the civil war in Lebanon, witnessed the suffering of Palestinian refugees in refugee camps, and more recently the displacement of Syrians at a time when those experiences at the humane level are rarely portrayed on a global scale beyond mere numbers and statistics. The Village therefore presents an opportunity to portray the daily experiences and personal stories of those that were displaced from their homes and countries through an unorthodox theatrical setting to show that we are all humans.

Why did you want to be involved in this production?
Growing up and during my undergraduate studies, I was very active with civil society organizations and community work including the Social Movement and the Red Cross among others. A lot of my work has been with the Palestinian refugees portraying their daily suffering inside the refugee camps through exhibitions, scenography and artistic work. I therefore wanted to be involved in this production being a natural extension to my previous work but on a global scale.

What is your intention with the design for this show?
My intention as I stated earlier, is to be able to portray the day-to-day challenges, experiences and personal stories of refugees and asylum seekers during their journeys to Australia in an approachable manner using the theatre as a medium. The ultimate goal being to ‘un’ ‘other’ refugees and to cast light on their personal stories showing that they too have similar goals and aspirations that bind us all and underwrite our humanity.  I hope that this production will be successful in portraying this as it only represents the tip of the iceberg of what the real journeys of refugees and asylum seekers look like.

How will the platform of this performance and the fact it’s not in a traditional theatre setting influence the way the design and the theatre complement each other?
Indeed, this is not a traditional theatre setting. Through collaborating with the MDA we heard stories from many of the refugees and asylum seekers a select of which are among the cast for this production. Through workshops, face-to-face group discussions and phone calls to their families that are left behind, they shared pictures and stories that informed and helped create the script, the set and its materials, and the details for the props.  This therefore presents an interactive bottom up approach to theatre design as opposed to orthodox theatre where the script is usually given. It is a nuanced approach to theatre design but admittedly is not always applicable and cannot replace the traditional approach.

09.05.17

Meet Cieavash Arean – Storyteller in The Village

“Appreciate and value the freedom we have in this beautiful country of ours, Australia” Cieavash Arean

Cieavash has dedicated his life to music for more than forty years. The instruments that he performs include – Barbat (Oud), Kamanche, Nay, Tar, Divan, Flute, Accordion, Daff, Zorna… Born in Tehran, Iran he plays traditional Middle Eastern music. These include – Turkish, Persian, Arabic and Armenian. He is self taught and plays by ear. Cieavash’s most recent performances have been in Woodford Folk Festival, QPAC, Customs and Government house (playing with James Morrison), Brisbane Multicultural Festival, Brisbane Festival, Brisbane Powerhouse, Bundaberg Multicultural Festival. He did the music for theatrical plays Vikram and The Vampire and A Beautiful Life – composed and played music for a short film called Fearless – and also played music for 1001 Nights by Queensland Theare Company and Queesland Music Festival.

Thank you for sharing your deeply personal stories with us as part of The Village. What has it been like to share your own story?
It is a very valuable opportunity to be able to let people know what has been done to Iranian and their home land by The Criminals who are running the country under Islamic laws.

What has the creative process been like for you so far?
It’s been very well done, by considering the restriction and limitations of theatrical play.

What is the most fundamental message you hope is taken away from the work?
Appreciate and value the freedom we have in this beautiful country of ours, Australia.

09.05.17

Meet Joyce Joyce Jattu Taylor – Storyteller in The Village

“We are all just ordinary people that woke up one day and found ourselves in extraordinary circumstances” Joyce Jattu Taylor

Joyce Jattu Taylor was born in Monrovia, Liberia and is the mother of two wonderful, half Aboriginal boys. Due to the civil War, left for Guinea in 1992 where she lived until 2002. Joyce arrived in Brisbane, Australia in 2002 on the ‘women at risk Visa’. Since arriving in Australia Joyce has worked as a Community Development worker for MDA (Multicultural Development Australia) from 2005 to present. In this role she has played an active part in supporting newly arrived refugees and asylum seekers through their resettlement process as they call Australia home. Joyce has also volunteered as the  Women’s Leader for LUWQ – Liberian United Women of Qld from 2004 – 2013,where this group created a safe space for the Liberian women to connect, share their knowledge, support each other, celebrate, learn from one another and have fun. Today, we have great women who are contributing immensely to the Australian community. Joyce has also worked alongside LAQ (Liberian Association of Qld), supporting the Liberian Community in Australia. Joyce has been amazed and humbled by the opportunity to share her story through a creative process, and with this hopefully making a difference in our community.

Thank you for sharing your deeply personal stories with us as part of the Village. What has it been like to share your own story?
It has been an emotional, yet amazing journey so far. What excites me the most, is knowing that sharing my deepest and most personal stories might inspire change – changing the conversation! By being part of this change in conversation I feel that there is the potential to make a difference on how we interact with others that come to Australia for safety and who now call it home.

What has the creative process being like for you so far?
It has helped me find my Voice and express myself in a more organised manner! I’ve told my stories so many times, but doing it in a creative way with such supportive and interesting people has been a truly amazing and very special experience for me.

What is the most fundamental message you hope is taken from the work?
I am hoping that from this work, the level of understanding creates empathy and tolerance from our audience. That it could potentially change the conversations around refugees and asylum seekers within our wider community and that each and every one of those audience members take on this conversation and start the change amongst their communities too!

We are all just ordinary people that woke up one day and found ourselves in extraordinary circumstances.

08.05.17

Meet Lili Sanchez – Storyteller in The Village

“The more we talk about our stories the more commonalities we find between each other.” Lili Sanchez

A bit about Lili Sanchez

Lili’s usually prefers the comfort of being behind the scenes as she enjoys creative writing and writes professionally for a blog. Lili is also currently finishing a degree in Anthropology and Philosophy, she enjoys reading the greats in her down time but is also largely passionate about studying and understanding different cultures. Lili is also a proud mother of a beautiful half Jamaican half Chilean 11 year old boy. It is important for Lili to tell her family’s story but most important to her is that her son is able to learn from this story.

Lili and her family have been in Australia for 26 years in total, and Arrived here on a Humanitarian Visa. She has lived 17 of these here in Brisbane. Her favourite place to sit down and write is at the top of a hill close to home, where she gets a beautiful view of the city.

Lili has experience telling her story since she was young commonly showcased in Latin American events in Melbourne. More recently Lili has been telling her story as a community educator for MDA (Multicultural Development Australia), Lili has been with MDA since November 2015, she has stood in front of a variety of audiences who have come from diverse backgrounds and experiences, some of these education sessions have included speaking at ISQ Early Childhood Forum and at an ECA (Executive Challenge Academy) leadership and development session.

Her current roles with MDA include working as a Skill up facilitator for young refugees and also working for one of MDAs newest programs, Welcome Residential.

What has it been like to share your own story?
I think its really special to share mine and my family’s story because first of all not many people get to do it, It is an absolute honour to represent the struggle that my family and I lived but also many other families who went through similar situations, I think the more we talk about our stories the more commonalities we find between each other. It is also really important for my son to understand where his mother comes from and for him to learn from our experience.

What has the creative process been like for you so far?
I’ve been able to explore different styles of narrating my story, I started with poetry and explored a little with that and from there I’ve moved onto writing a more descriptive story making it feel very real, it’s been an interesting, emotional but fantastic journey so far full of discovery.

What is the most fundamental message you hope is taken away from the work?
I think the most important message I would like for people to take away is the reality that people only leave their homes when the conditions are extreme, nobody wants to leave their family and loved ones, people leave because they are in danger or have no other choice, they have a well founded fear for their life, I think that the variety of different stories showcased will be able to demonstrate that it doesn’t matter about religion, or race or political agenda, not even sexuality we are all fundamentally seeking the same thing, safety.

 

03.05.17

Meet Muhammad Akram – Storyteller in The Village

“It is an honour for me to share my personal story which highlights the plight of asylum seekers and refugees.” Muhammad Akram

Muhammad Akram was born in Quetta, Pakistan. He is from the Hazara people. He completed his university education and was working as an ESL teacher in Quetta. The situation in his home country became very dangerous for Hazaras which forced him to flee. In 2012, he arrived in Australia to seek asylum. He is a passionate young man, always inspired by helping others. During his time in Australian detention centres, he volunteered by teaching English to his fellow asylum seekers. He is settled into his new life in Brisbane and he worked at MDA (Multicultural Development Australia) from 2013-2017. As part of MDA’s community education program, he has shared his personal story of survival, resilience and seeking asylum on various platforms. He believes through storytelling we can change the conversation about refugees and asylum seekers in our society. In 2016, he was offered a scholarship by the University of Adelaide where he is currenlty studying Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting and Corporate Finance). He is very grateful to Australia. He is doing his best and looking forward to give back to the community.

Thank you for sharing your deeply personal stories with us as part of The Village. What has it been like to share your own story?
It is an honour for me to share my personal story which highlights the plight of asylum seekers and refugees. I believe it is very important for me because not everyone gets to do it. It requires a lot of emotional energy to reflect on what I have been through but at the same time it is the resilience and survival in my story that really inspires me.

What has the creative process been like for you so far?
It is my first time working with a theatre company and it has been great experience so far. I have been able to work with other storytellers and creative team of the village. We have been working together to create and deliver performances that are real, inspiring and interactive.

What is the most fundamental message you hope is taken away from the work?
The most fundamental message I hope our audience to take away is that people are forced to flee their countries because of persecution, war and violence, they don’t have a choice. Refugees and asylum seekers are just ordinary people like everyone else. They are human beings who are seeking safety which is their human rights.

03.05.17

Meet Silva A Sal: Assistant Director of The Village

As part of our Assistant Creatives Program, Silva A Sal will be joining La Boite as Assistant Director on The Village.

Silva A Sal is an emerging director, writer and performer. He has worked across the middle east on multiple productions prior to relocating in Australia. Starting his university theatre education. After graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Contemporary and Applied Theatre (2015), Silva began his quest to create his own theatre company, through which he has produced and directed shows of numerous thematic varieties. Silva’s work and educational experience includes physical, oriental and contemporary theatre. His theatre credits include Wonders of a Godless World (2012), The Vagina Monologues (2014), Shout the Legend of Johnny O’Keefe (2016) and many more.

Silva’s life experiences of travel, war and continuous uncertainty has moulded his unique understanding of infinite risk taking. Over the next year Silva wishes to use western pop-culture to discourse of his middle eastern cultural background through verbatim theatre. The theatre world has given Silva a forum for expression and freedom of speech, which in itself was never possible prior to living in arriving to Australia. This is Silva’s first experience with La Boite theatre and he looks forward to many more.

Thank you for sharing your deeply personal stories with us as part of The Village. What has it been like to share your own story? 
I have always been open about my story and how I ended up here in Australia. However, this show has given me a chance to comfortably share whilst serving an important message of intercultural understanding of who we are, why are we here and what are we doing here. Informing the misinformed and of course sharing our culture. It has been an absolutely joyous atmosphere where I was comfortable with opening up and sharing as well as listening up and hearing everyone else’s incredible stories of struggle, survival and the joy of ending up in a safe world.

What has the creative process been like for you so far?
The process for me has been firstly safe and secondly inspiring. Learning from an assistant directive role of how to keep members of our team happy and safe in order for us to have their trust that their personal stories will be respected and never abused.

What is the most fundamental message you hope is taken away from the work?
We need to start thinking about our immanent incredible future of intercultural traditions that our future generations will build and practice.

28.02.17

Meet Ayeesha Ash: Assistant Director of The Village

As part of our Assistant Creatives Program, Ayeesha Ash will be joining La Boite as Assistant Director on The Village.

Ayeesha was born in St. George’s, Grenada to parents of Caribbean and Maori heritage. Raised in Queensland, Ayeesha trained extensively in singing and dance before being accepted into the Queensland Academy for Creative Industries, where she majored in acting. In 2011 Ayeesha moved from Queensland to Perth to continue her acting studies at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts. Since graduating Ayeesha has appeared in plays in Queensland and Sydney including The Seagull (Now Look Here Theatre Co.), Rent (Hayes Theatre Co.) and Drift (Two Peas).

In late 2015 Black Birds was created. Black Birds is an all-female co-operative led by core members, Ayeesha & Emele Ugavule. With each project, creatives are invited to collaborate on works that dissect the Black and Brown diasporic experience in Australia through art and performance in a variety of mediums and spaces – both theatrical and non-theatrical. In September, Black Birds was created in a film and visual art and featured at the exhibition ‘Capiche’ held at aMBUSH Gallery (Central Park).

In October 2016, Black Birds was a part of the inaugural Women In Theatre & Screen (WITS) Festival Fatale. Performed at The Eternity Playhouse, this original work was created with a focus on exploring poetry and spoken word in a theatrical setting. In 2016, Black Birds was given the opportunity to develop new work at The Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre, Penrith as part of Q Lab. This development will see a theatrical version of a new Black Birds work performed at The Joan in March/April 2017.

28.02.17